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TurboFloat Server

TurboFloat Server iconTurboFloat Server is the application that doles out floating license "leases" to your app. The TurboFloat Server runs on the customer's local network. It doesn't have to be run on "server hardware" per se; TurboFloat Server is designed and optimized to be low profile, low memory, and very fast. This means an end-customer could run TurboFloat Server on an old laptop plugged into an ethernet outlet in an old janitor's closet if they so please.

This guide covers how to activate and install the TurboFloat Server using commandline. However, if you're releasing TurboFloat Server for end users you might consider wrapping this entire process in an installer so your user only has to enter some text in and installer and then click the install button.

Also, it should be noted, that the "TurboFloat Server" can be completely rebranded. That is, your end-users never have to know about "TurboFloat". You can rename TurboFloatServer.exe to anything you want.

This article covers the following topics (click to skip to the topic):


Activating the TurboFloat Server

Before you can use TurboFloat Server it must be activated. To activate the TurboFloat Server online simply pass the product key like this:

TurboFloatServer.exe -a="ABCD-EFGH-IJKL-MNOP-QRST-UVWX"

Online activation connects to the activation servers using port 80 (HTTP) or port 443 (HTTPS). If you specify a proxy in the configuration then the TurboFloat Server instance will try to connect to the activation servers through that.

If you've already activated and you want to re-activate, then you don't need to pass a new product key. You can just call TurboFloat Server with the "-a" commandline argument:

TurboFloatServer.exe -a

Activating offline

You can also activate the TurboFloat Server offline. There are 2 steps in the offline activation: (1) generating the "activation request" and (2) using the "activation response" to actually activate the TurboFloat Server.

To generate the activation request you have to pass in the product key and the location to save the "activation request" XML file. For example:

TurboFloatServer.exe -a="ABCD-EFGH-IJKL-MNOP-QRST-UVWX" -areq="C:\Location\To\Save\ActivationRequest.xml"

After submitting the activation request to the company, and receiving the activation response, you can activate the TurboFloat Server:

TurboFloatServer.exe -a -aresp="C:\Location\To\ActivationResponse.xml"

Using different paths for "TurboActivate.dat" or "TurboFloatServer-config.xml"

When the TurboFloat Server is activating it needs to load both the "TurboActivate.dat" and "TurboFloatServer-config.xml" files. By default the TurboFloat Server looks in the directory in which it's sitting for these files. If, however, you'd like to use different paths for one or both of these files you can do so by using the "-pdets" and/or the "-config" commandline switches. For example:

TurboFloatServer.exe -a="ABCD-EFGH-IJKL-MNOP-QRST-UVWX" -pdets="YourTurboActivate.dat" -config="Config.xml"

Deactivating the TurboFloat Server

If your customers want to move the TurboFloat Server from one computer to another computer they have to deactivate from the first computer before they can activate on the second computer. To deactivate the TurboFloat Server instance you must use the "-deact" commandline switch:

TurboFloatServer.exe -deact

Or, if you wish to deactivate offline (i.e. generate an offline activation request) then you must pass a file path using the "-deact" commandline switch:

TurboFloatServer.exe -deact="C:\Location\To\OfflineReq.xml"

Installing the TurboFloat Server (Windows & Mac OS X)

On Windows and Mac OS X you can use a simple commandline switch "-i" to setup your TurboFloat Server. On success, "TurboFloatServer" returns 0, on failure it returns non-zero.

On Windows this "installation" does three things:

  1. It installs the TurboFloat Server instance as a Windows Service set to start with the computer and run silently in the background.

  2. It configures the TurboFloat Server to allow inbound connections in the Windows Firewall (unless the Windows Firewall service is disabled, in which case it skips this step).

  3. It starts the TurboFloat Server immediately.

On Mac OS X this "installation" does two things:

  1. It installs the TurboFloat Server instance as a "launchd" daemon set to start with the computer and run silently in the background.

  2. It starts the TurboFloat Server immediately.

If you have any firewall software running on Mac OS X then you'll have to set it to allow incoming connections to the TurboFloat Server instance.

The process of installing the TurboFloat Server is the same on Mac OS X & Windows. First put the TurboFloatServer.exe, TurboActivate.dat, and TurboFloatServer-config.xml files in their final locations. Then simply use the -i commandline switch:

TurboFloatServer.exe -i

Or, on Mac OS X:

sudo ./TurboFloatServer -i

If you want to specify alternate locations for the "TurboActivate.dat" and "TurboFloatServer-config.xml" then use the "-pdets" and/or "-config" commandline switches in tandem with the "-i" switch:

TurboFloatServer.exe -i -pdets="YourTurboActivate.dat" -config="Config.xml"

If you want to install the TurboFloat Server, but don't want it to start immediately, then use the "-delaystart" commandline switch:

TurboFloatServer.exe -i -delaystart

This installs the TurboFloat Server instance but it doesn't start the service. The service will be started on the next restart of the computer. You, or the end-user, can programmatically or manually start the service in the meantime.


Uninstalling the TurboFloat Server (Windows & Mac OS X)

To uninstall the TurboFloat Server simply use the "-u" commandline switch:

TurboFloatServer.exe -u

On success, TurboFloatServer.exe returns 0, on failure it returns non-zero.

On Windows this "uninstallation" does three things:

  1. It stops the TurboFloat Server immediately.

  2. It removes the Windows Firewall configuration settings for the TurboFloat Server instance if both of the following conditions are met:

    1. The Windows Firewall settings were setup during the installation.

    2. The Windows Firewall service is running at the time the uninstallation is taking place.

    If either one of those conditions isn't true, then the uninstallation process simply skips this step.

  3. It removes the TurboFloat Server instance from the Windows Services.

On Mac OS X this "uninstallation" does two things:

  1. It stops the TurboFloat Server immediately.

  2. It removes the TurboFloat Server instance from the "launchd" daemons list.

For both Windows & Mac OS X this uninstallation process leaves the files intact (TurboFloatServer.exe, TurboFloatServer-config.xml, and TurboActivate.dat). If you want the files removed you'll have to remove them after using the "-u" commandline switch.

Note for Mac OS X: If, during the installation, you used the "-pdets" commandline switch, then you'll have to use that switch again during the uninstallation. For example:

sudo ./TurboFloatServer -u -pdets="/Path/To/TurboActivate.dat"

If you didn't use the "-pdets" commandline switch during the installation then you can just uninstall with the "-u" commandline switch.

You don't have to worry about this on Windows due to design differences. The Windows version of the TurboFloat Server "remembers" arguments you passed in.


Installing the TurboFloat Server (Linux)

Since Linux installations vary wildly in how they run "daemons" or "startup services" we don't offer the "-i" commandline switch for Linux. However, you can build the init script yourself (for systemd, System V init, upstart, or any other init system) to launch the TurboFloat Server instance upon the computer's start.

When you're running the TurboFloat Server instance from your init script there are 2 commandline options you'll want to use:

/path/to/turbofloatserver -x -silent

That will tell the TurboFloat Server instance to run and to run silently (not outputting to "stderr").


Configuring the TurboFloat Server

The configuration file for the TurboFloat Server is a simple XML file with UTF-8 encoding. Included in the TurboFloat Server package is an example configuration file. For most end-users almost all of the configuration settings will be good out of the box. And because the configuration file is an XML file, some characters can't be used because they have a special meaning in XML files. The appropriate "XML entities" must be used in their place:

Use this...    ...in place of this
&          &
&lt;           <
&gt;           >
&quot;         "
&apos;         '

The configuration file is only loaded at the start of TurboFloat Server. If you make any changes to the configuration file while the TurboFloat Server is running they'll be ignored until the next time the TurboFloat Server is started.

<log .../> (Required)

This element configures the log file to write errors, warnings, and any information. For example:

<log file="tfs-log.txt" level="warning"/>

"file" attribute

Where the log file will be written / appended to. The floating license server must have access to this file and the directory must exist.

You can use either absolute path or a relative path. If you use a relative path then the log file will be written relative to the TurboFloat Server executable file.

"level" attribute

The amount of information you want TurboFloat Server to output to the log file. These are the possible level settings:

<bind .../> (Required)

Setup the port you want the TurboFloat Server to bind to. For example:

<bind port="13"/>

The TurboFloat Server instance will listen for TCP connections on this port for both IPv4 and IPv6. If the system doesn't support IPv6, then the TurboFloat Server instance will only listen on IPv4.

<cpu .../> (Required)

Setup how many worker threads you want the server to use. We recommend setting this to 1 thread per CPU "core". If you set this value to "0" then TurboFloat Server will automatically detect how many cores the computer has and use that value. For example:

<cpu threads="0"/>

<lease .../> (Required)

Setup how long a license lease should last. The time is in seconds. We recommend 30 minutes (i.e. 1800 seconds):

<lease length="1800"/>

The shorter you make this time the more often the "client" programs will have to contact this server, and thus the more load on the server and the more traffic on the network. The only time "long" leases will be a problem is if the client programs end abruptly without first telling the server that the lease is no longer needed. Thus a "zombie" lease will take up one of the lease slots until it expires.

The absolute minimum time you can use is 30 seconds.

<isgenuine .../> (Required)

Set how often to recheck this TurboFloat Server's activation. This TurboFloat Server instance will contact the activation servers through wyday.com on port 80 or port 443 depending on a number of factors. (So, http://wyday.com and https://wyday.com must be whitelisted for this process so that it can contact those sites).

"days_between" attribute

How many days between check. Minimum 1. Maximum 90. We recommend 90.

"grace" attribute

The number of grace period days on an internet failure. Maximum 14.

<isgenuine days_between="90" grace="14"/>

<proxy .../> (Optional)

The proxy that this TurboFloat Server instance will need to use when it needs to contact LimeLM to activate, re-activate, and verify with the LimeLM servers.

<proxy url="http://user:pass@127.0.0.1:8080/"/>

Running TurboFloat Server from commandline

If you would rather just run the TurboFloat Server from the commandline, rather than installing it, you can do that using the "-x" command switch:

TurboFloatServer.exe -x

In that example the TurboFloat Server instance will run from the commandline and the "TurboActivate.dat" and "TurboFloatServer-config.xml" files will be loaded from the same directory as the "TurboFloatServer.exe" file. If you want to load either (or both) the "TurboActivate.dat" or the "TurboFloatServer-config.xml" files from separate locations then use the "-pdets" and/or "-config" commandline switches in tandem with the "-x" switch:

TurboFloatServer.exe -x -pdets="C:\location\to\TurboActivate.dat" -config="C:\Location\To\Config.xml"

View the TurboFloat Server Commandline options article for all other commandline options.


Upgrading the TurboFloat Server instance

We're continually improving TurboFloat & the TurboFloat Server (fixing bugs, improving performance, and adding features). You can always get the latest and greatest version of TurboFloat / TurboFloat Server on your API page.

Upgrading the TurboFloat Server instance is simple:

  1. Stop the running old instance of the TurboFloat Server.

  2. Replace the old TurboFloatServer.exe (or whatever you've renamed it as) with the new version.

  3. Start the TurboFloat Server instance again.

Windows & Mac OS X

If you want to make this easier for the end-user you might consider automating this process. To start / stop the TurboFloat Server Windows Service instance you must use the "service name" of "TurboFloatServer-[VERSIONID]". Or, on Mac OS X, the "launchd daemon label" will be "com.turbofloatserver.[VERSIONID]".

The "[VERSIONID]" value is the id of the version where the product key is from. You can get the version ID by examining the URL in your browser. For instance, from the URL https://wyday.com/limelm/version/100/ you can see the version ID is 100. (Note: The Version ID is not the Version GUID).

So if your version id is "100" then the service name for your TurboFloat Server instance is "TurboFloatServer-100" on Windows. Here's how you would stop the service from commandline:

sc stop TurboFloatServer-100

And to start the service again:

sc start TurboFloatServer-100

Similarly, on Mac OS X, if your version id is "100" then the "launchd daemon label" will be "com.turbofloatserver.100". Here's how you would stop the daemon from commandline:

sudo launchctl stop com.turbofloatserver.100

And to start the service again:

sudo launchctl start com.turbofloatserver.100