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The wyDay blog is where you find all the latest news and tips about our existing products and new products to come.


wyDay blog

November 5th, 2019

We’re proud to announce that we’ve made it possible to sell your app on a per-process-instance basis. Meaning you can directly limit how many instances of your app your customers can run at any one time.

It’s available now for all LimeLM customers!

This new per-instance lease issuance is the alternative to the per-user-session leases that TurboFloat Server issued by default. The differences between the two is shown in the gif above as well as described in “Fine-grained control: per-instance vs. per-user session leases“:

With the release of TurboFloat 4.1 we added the ability to issue leases either on a per-process-instance basis or a per-user session basis. This gives you more control over how you sell your software and how it’s used by your customers.

For per-user-session leases, one lease is issued per-user session on a machine (real or virtual) that is using at least one instance of your app. For example, “Sally Doe” starting your app on a shared server will be able to start multiple instances of your app and it will use that one lease regardless of how many instances they start in that user-session on that machine.

For per-process-instance leases, one lease is issued for every instance of your app started. Every separate process-instance of your app started will request a license lease whether the separate instances are in the same user-session or are in multiple different user-sessions.

So, how do you use it? Simple: first, make sure you’re using the latest version of the TurboFloat Server and TurboFloat library (get them on your API page). Then create a new TurboFloat Server key (or edit an existing one) and select the “per-process-instance leases” option.

That’s it. We handle the rest. Easy-peasy, lemon (lime?) squeezy.

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